A member of the church (L) picks up a cross during a reenactment from the Bible, the crucifixion of Jesus Christ on Good Friday, in Sydney on April 19, 2019. - Good Friday, part of the Easter weekend, is a Christian religious holiday commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death and is a public holiday throughout Australia. (AFP / Peter Parks)

Facebook dismisses hoax that it has 'banned' users from sharing the Lord’s Prayer

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Multiple Facebook posts claim that publishing the Lord’s Prayer on Facebook violates the platform’s policies. The claim is false; a Facebook spokesperson said sharing the Lord’s Prayer is not against the site’s policies.

The claim was published on Facebook here on July 5, 2020.

The post reads: “THIS IS SO SAD. ....... After hearing Facebook is saying that posting the Lord’s Prayer goes against their policies, I’m asking all Christians please post the Lord’s Prayer:
Our Father who art in heaven hallowed be Thy name, Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day, our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, for Thine is the Kingdom, the Power, and the Glory forever.” 

A screenshot of the misleading post as of July 27, 2020.

 

Other instances of the claim appear on Facebook here, here, here, here, here and here.

The claim, however, is false.

A Facebook spokesperson said posting the Lord’s Prayer does not violate the site’s policies.

“Our Community Standards are in place to keep people safe and to ensure they feel empowered to express themselves freely on Facebook and outline what is and is not allowed on Facebook. Posting the Lord’s Prayer does not violate our policies,” the spokesperson told AFP in an email on July 23, 2020.

Facebook’s Community Standards make no reference to the Lord’s Prayer or detail any restrictions on religious expression.

The false claim was also debunked by fact-checking organisations Snopes and Full Fact.