These photos of Malaysia's health minister were taken at two different Covid-19 vaccine events

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Facebook posts circulating in Malaysia claim photos of a politician posing after his first and second Covid-19 vaccine doses were in fact taken on the same day, accusing him of lying about being double-jabbed. The posts point to the fact he appears to be wearing the same outfit in both photos. The claim is false; while Khairy Jamaluddin wore the same black t-shirt and trousers to both his Covid-19 vaccinations in March and April 2021, he sported different shoes and socks.

"Same shirt... same hairstyle," reads a Malay-language Facebook post shared on January 6, 2022.

It shows two photos of Khairy wearing a black t-shirt. In the first picture, he holds a placard that reads: "I have been vaccinated" while in the second picture, his placard reads: "I completed two doses".

"Only the placard is different. FATE OR COINCIDENCE??? Or just the same image taken before editing for media posts?" it adds.

Screenshot of the misleading Facebook post taken on January 13, 2022

Khairy, who was then chief of Malaysia's Covid-19 vaccination programme, became the first person in the country to receive a Covid-19 Sinovac vaccine on March 18, 2021.

He became health minister in August 2021.

Similar Facebook posts shared the two photos here, here, here and here.

However, the claim is false.

First photo

A reverse image search found the first photo in a Malay-language report published by local news site Sinar Harian on March 18, 2021.

The headline reads: "KJ is the first person to receive the Sinovac vaccine shot".

The photo's caption reads: "Khairy Jamaluddin just finished receiving Sinovac's Covid-19 vaccine at the Vaccination Centre at Rembau Hospital."

Screenshot of the Sinar Harian report

Photos from Khairy's first Covid-19 vaccination at Rembau Hospital were also posted in a tweet by the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MOSTI) and in a Facebook post on Khairy's official page on the same day.

Second photo

A reverse image search found the second photo in a tweet from MOSTI's account on April 8, 2021.

The Malay-language tweet reads: "The Honourable @Khairykj received the second dose of the Sinovac vaccine at Rembau Hospital in Negeri Sembilan today, along with frontline workers."

The same photo and other photos from Khairy's second vaccination were posted on his Facebook page and MOSTI's website on the same day.

Different outfit

While Khairy wore a black t-shirt and black trousers for his first and second Covid-19 vaccinations, a closer look at the photos found he was wearing different shoes and socks.

Photos from his first vaccine on March 18, 2021 here and here show Khairy wearing black boots and yellow socks.

Below is a screenshot comparison of photos from Khairy's first vaccination:

Screenshot comparison of photos from Khairy's first vaccination

Below is a close-up comparison of his footwear and socks during the first vaccination appointment.

Close-up comparison of Khairy's footwear and socks during the first vaccination appointment

For his second vaccine on April 8, 2021, he sported a pair of black trainers with white trimmings and turquoise amd yellow socks, as seen in photos here and here.

Below is a screenshot comparison of photos from Khairy's second vaccination:

Screenshot comparison of photos from Khairy's second vaccination

Below is a close-up comparison of his footwear and socks during the second vaccination appointment.

Close-up comparison of Khairy's footwear and socks during the second vaccination appointment

Khairy's press secretary Raja Syahrir Abu Bakar told AFP: "He wore same t-shirt for both occasions. But you can see the shoes and socks are different."

Malaysia kicked off its Covid-19 vaccination campaign on February 24, 2021, with then-prime minister Muhyiddin Yassin receiving the first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech jab.

The latest data, from February 7, 2022, shows that nearly 80% of the Malaysian population have received two vaccine doses.

COVID-19 VACCINES